Home / news / Coronavirus: Singapore PM calls for end to US-China blame game, wants to see leadership from Trump administration

Coronavirus: Singapore PM calls for end to US-China blame game, wants to see leadership from Trump administration

Coronavirus: Singapore PM calls for end to US-China blame game, wants to see leadership from Trump administration

View Reddit by panopticon_aversionView Source

15 comments

  1. Been waiting for four years on that one, bud.

    Edit: Thanks for the gold!

    Also for the triggered anti-China commenters: Criticizing POTUS on a public forum is not equivalent to, and I quote, “sucking People’s Republic of China’s dick”. That’s like saying I’m a Nazi because I think Stalin was a murderous dictator. Leave your black and white thinking back in the 50s where it belongs.

  2. Speaking as a Brazilian who’s also concerned for how this thing is going to decimate the USA (well, Brazil too), it’s really refreshing to see a sane national leader. Even though his pleas will be completely fruitless.

    Edit: Wow, I kicked a hornet’s nest here, haven’t I? Guys. I do hope I’m wrong, of course. And Trump recently changing his tune on lockdown sure is heartening. But the problem with the US is a much deeper one. You guys do have a much better healthcare structure than us, yes… But yours is financially locked away from most of the population. This situation right here might be a huge test of the US’s “be sick or be bankrupt” philosophy on healthcare. Here in Brazil, aside from our insane science-denialist leadership (in which Brazil and the US are the same, except ours seems not to be kept in check by the rest of the federal structure as well as yours), the problem is that our public healthcare, although free and universal, is tragically underfunded and underequipped, and private healthcare is too small in scope to do much in a mass crisis like this. There are measures in motion to shore up our public healthcare’s funding, but I don’t see that doing much to solve the problem in the short term. So, again… I do hope I’m wrong, for obvious reasons, but that doesn’t sound like a realistic hope to me.

  3. Playing the blame game while the pandemic is going on is a waste of time. If you can spend time assigning the blame you can put that time wasted into doing something productive for the crisis.

    Also both Trump and Xi are playing it to deflect blame from their own constituents. Only by having a foreign power to deflect blame on can they reduce anger against their missteps.

    That being said, America really needs to step up on their game for foreign policy, The Bush(2nd) era neglect of the south east asia caused the region to gravitate towards China, Obama sort of stopped that, and Trump’s foreign policy(or lack of) has accelerated the issue again.

    Singapore’s foreign policy statements are usually neutral. Our favourite being “We urge all parties to exercise restraint”. The passive aggressive statement where our PM asks Trump to ‘Show Leadership’ is pointing out how annoyed we are at Trump’s actions during these trying times.

  4. Well leadership from the Trump is very important for Singapore especially now that they are importing more cases from the US. If they didnt start the ban on US nationals already, they will soon.

  5. >Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said on Sunday it would be a pity if the United States failed to put to use its immense expertise, soft power and resources to lead global efforts to overcome the “grave challenge to mankind” posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.
    >
    >Speaking in a live interview with CNN, the Southeast Asian city state’s leader also decried the US-China blame game that has erupted in recent weeks over the outbreak, saying it was “not going to help us solve the problem sooner”.
    >
    >The comments by the Singaporean leader come as US President Donald Trump’s administration remains mired in criticism over its fractured response to the crisis, with few countries looking to the American leader or his top officials for guidance on dealing with the pandemic.
    >
    >Instead, the fastidious approaches wielded by the likes of Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea in testing and tracking down infected people are being seen as instructive for the rest of the world.
    >
    >China, which is slowly recovering after bearing the early brunt of the outbreak, has meanwhile started to assert a leadership role by doling out donations of medical supplies to dozens of its trading partners.
    >
    >Lee, speaking to CNN’s Fareed Zakaria by video link, said he wanted to see American leadership of the situation.
    >
    >“Yes, of course. You have the resources, you have the science, you have the influence, you have the soft power, and you have the track record of dealing with these problems convincingly and successfully, and in the greater good of many countries, not just the US,” Lee said.
    >
    >“It’s a pity not to put those resources to work now to deal with this very grave challenge to mankind”.
    >
    >The trading of barbs and insults between Washington and China over who was to blame for the pandemic was a “most unfortunate situation”, Lee said.
    >
    >“Under the best of circumstances there’s going to be a very difficult challenge for mankind. But if the US and China are swapping insults and blaming one another for inventing the virus and letting it loose on the world, I don’t think that that is going to help us solve the problem sooner,” he said.
    >
    >Lee – whose country has emerged in recent years as one of Washington’s most important strategic partners in Southeast Asia – signalled that countries may turn elsewhere if American leadership was not forthcoming to lead the fight against the virus.
    >
    >“The world has greatly benefited from American leadership in situations like this for decades,” Lee said. But if “America is in a different mode, well, we will get by and I think other configurations will eventually work out but it would be a loss,” the prime minister said.
    >
    >Asked about the continued rhetoric by the likes of the US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo that China’s opacity and throttling of whistle-blowers in the early days of the outbreak was in some way to blame for the health crisis, Lee said he did not believe that “one can say this would not have happened if only the Chinese [had] done the right thing”.
    >
    >“You look at the way the outbreak has continued, grown and spread in many countries. They don’t have the Chinese government and yet they have not found it easy to keep the outbreak under control in their country.”
    >
    >While Singapore has done far better than some of its neighbours in containing the outbreak – the city state had 844 confirmed cases and three fatalities as of Sunday – Lee said his government was under “no illusions that we have won”.
    >
    >“I would hesitate to talk about success because we are right in the midst of a battle which is intensifying,” the 68-year-old leader said. Lee also touched on the economic impact of the pandemic, saying he did not expect the situation to normalise until “people gain confidence that they have a hold on the virus [and] that we can resume normal socialising, normal travelling and normal human intercourse”.
    >
    >Lee said it could be several years before the virus runs its course throughout the world “unless something happens to abort that process”.
    >
    >There are expectations that Lee, in power since 2004, may soon call an snap election in the midst of the pandemic to secure a fresh mandate to deal with the economic turmoil. Preliminary forecasts suggest the trade-reliant economy could experience its worst ever recession this year.
    >
    >Asked if the crisis would compel him to postpone his well-publicised plan to step down some time after the next general election, Lee said he was focused on the task at hand. “This crisis keeps my hands full. Let’s just focus on that for now,” he said.

  6. We should listen to them. Singapore has kept its Coronavirus curve among the flattest.

  7. “Trump later responded to the call out and had the following to say”

    Trump – “What’s Singapore?”

    “Now onto sports”

  8. Interesting how Chinese officials blaming the U.S. Army didnt make it into the article.

  9. >wants to see leadership from Trump administration

    LOL

    Guy must think Obama’s still the President of the United States of America.

  10. Everyone’s stating the obvious – Trump has no leadership. This is more of a political statement for south-east asia region/ASEAN. Simply put, if the US can’t be the stable country it has been since the Cold War, many ASEAN countries will align with China, whether by choice or otherwise. In fact, some countries has shown preference for the Chinese, if only for the money.

    Edit: ASEAN countries aligning with China has the hallmarks of a cultural/soft power war or a Cold War episode 2. China has several African countries in their pocket too, so there’s that.

  11. Seems par for the course – China and the US are doing something wrong…the USA gets called out, China gets nothing.

    Maybe if this wasn’t a trend they wouldn’t have opened the wet markers back up after the original SARS outbreak…

Leave a Reply