Home / news / The anger of the street and the disruption of government formation .. The Maronite Patriarch warns of a “hungry revolution” in Lebanon

The anger of the street and the disruption of government formation .. The Maronite Patriarch warns of a “hungry revolution” in Lebanon

The Maronite Patriarch in Lebanon, Cardinal Mar Bechara Boutros Al-Rai, warned of the outbreak of a hungry revolution and the collapse of the country, in case the formation of the government continues, calling on the government to recognize the real causes of popular anger.

This came during a mass that he presided over today, Sunday, north of Beirut. Al-Ra’i said that the persistence in disrupting the formation of the government would cause the hungry to revolt and deprive them of their most basic rights and push the country to collapse. And he added, “This is a conspiratorial and destructive logic that requires an end to it in order to save Lebanon.”

Al-Ra’i condemned the acts of violence during the social demonstrations in the city of Tripoli (north), blaming the politicians for the deteriorating living conditions in the city.

Al-Rahi called on Lebanese officials to stop ignoring the true causes of the demonstrations, which are “social, financial, professional and living.”

Over the past week, Tripoli has witnessed protests against the deteriorating living conditions and the continuation of the curfew imposed due to the fight against the Corona virus.

According to the Lebanese Red Cross, clashes between protesters and security forces left one dead and more than 200 wounded.

Al-Rai held the politicians responsible for the deteriorating living conditions in Tripoli (Anatolia)

The protests are continuing

Yesterday evening, Saturday, popular protests against the difficult living conditions continued in Tripoli.

A number of Lebanese demonstrators also organized protest vigils in the city of Sidon, in southern Lebanon, and in the capital, Beirut, to express their solidarity with the protesters in the city of Tripoli in the north of the country.

The demonstrators criticized “the policy of starvation and suppression of demonstrators and the use of force in the face of popular movements.”

For months, Lebanon has been suffering the worst economic crisis since the end of the civil war (1975-1990), and is witnessing a sharp political polarization, in a scene in which the interests of regional and Western countries clash.

Due to differences between the political forces, Lebanon has not yet been able to form a new government, since Hassan Diab’s government resigned after 6 days of a catastrophic explosion in the port of the capital Beirut on August 4.




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